Monday, May 8, 2017

Fingers Crossed

I think I have found a place for Stinker.  I have to wait another month before it is 100% positive.  Right now it is sitting at 99% positive, but there is always that slight chance it will fall through.  I knew about it about a month ago, but was too paranoid to say anything.  Jinxes are real yo.

The weather was not so nice and the picture doesn't do it justice.

If everything works out, I will be doing the majority of his care and need to get a lot of barn essentials.  So what are your favorite barn essentials?  I am talking things like pitchforks, wheelbarrows, the everyday things that you don't necessarily think about.

16 comments:

  1. Fingers crossed everything works out!! 😁

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  2. Cryptic blog is cryptic BUT I KNOW THE TRUTH

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    1. Haha it is a war between excitement must tell everyone and omg don't jinx it

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  3. my fingers are crossed too!!

    idk anything about specific brands for equipment - but my preference for pitchforks is the standard not-fancy version (not any of that gimmicky individual tine stuff). for me, it's most critical that the pitchfork not be too heavy bc it wears on my elbows over time. i also like to have both the little single-wheel barrows and the big heavy duty double-wheel barrows. both are useful for different purposes. good wide-diameter hoses are a must (tho it's also guaranteed that every hose has a limited lifespan, unfortunately), as are those nifty little hose connectors, splitters, etc. i'm picky about brooms personally, but that might just be me. long-handled dust pans are also super handy. and you can never have too many buckets (water buckets, feed tubs, 5gal buckets, smaller feed buckets, big water troughs, supp buckets, all of 'em), and naturally scrubby brushes to go along. plus all the extra clips and chains and tools (like nippers! and box cutters! and hammers!) and zip ties and whatnot for every odd job that might arise lol.

    idk. it's a lot of stuff. i tend to be really big into stuff that helps me work more efficiently. but i also think that figuring it out as you go is often a reasonable solution too, as you figure out the ways and rhythms of the new farm. good luck!

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    1. This is so helpful! It's the little things like zip ties that I wouldn't think of until I need them. And then it doesn't do you much good.

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  4. Self care can be tough. We did it every day for years and only recently got someone else to do the stalls 6 days and we still do the 1. We still do our own feeding and repairs around the barn. I like the wheelbarrows with handles like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/True-Temper-6-cu-ft-Poly-Wheelbarrow-with-Total-Control-Handles-RP6TC14/206171063.

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    1. I am sure there will be an adjustments, but the ability to control his turnout outweighs the other things.

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  5. Looks awesome! I hope everything comes together and it's a successful move!

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  6. Hmmmm self care. Emma hit a lot of the things. I hate gimmicky forks- they all break anyway, so spend less and get a standard fork (the standard fork at the farm has lasted the longest btw!). I like garbage cans for feed bins- or do medium sized air tight pet food containers (I imagine a 40lb grain bag lasts longer for one horse so this might be an option!). Make sure whatever it is can be locked on so wild animals can't get into it. I like heavy duty wheelbarrows if I can't use a manure spreader. Every time I horse show I wish I had room for one because I can actually muck the stall in one shot instead of 3-4 trips with the muck bucket! Tons of buckets, and I prefer the bucket hanging straps.

    Can't wait for more details!

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    1. I hate the much buckets. A wheelbarrow is a must.

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  7. Oh that is exciting that you are closer. You cannot have enough hooks. Or buckets.

    I love my wave fork. It is the best pitchfork I have ever used.

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  8. I prefer a pitchfork with a wooden handle bc I find the metal ones get to dang cold in the winter… as for the rest of the stuff… well it's one of those things you find out as you need tuem bc every barn works differently… so good luck and fingers crossed the barn works out for you!!!!

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  9. Hi, just stumbled across your blog & love this topic, so here goes (I have a Standardbred & 2 minis at home): Wave fork - they're LIGHT, and those few ounces make a huge difference that your shoulders/wrists will thank you for. Rubbermaid plastic yard card with solid tires -- lasts forever, perfectly balanced, the best wheelbarrow ever. I keep feed in a locking feed bin from State Line tack that I got for about $150. It seems expensive, but it's bug/rodent/pony/neighbor proof and holds all of my feed, supplements, snacks and whatever. I don't lock it, just use a snap, but it still works very well to keep every mammal out. I bought a wardrobe at a thrift store - old, oak, heavy - that works great as a tack-locker and keeps everything clean. Just add lotsa hooks. A toolbox for the barn is handy: hammer, screwdrivers, tin snips, adjustable wrench or two, bolt cutters, and of course, zip ties, duct tape and a wad of bale twine. Enjoy!

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